Planning and Preparedness

​Natural and man-made disasters can happen suddenly and at anytime, these sites provide you with information about the importance of planning and preparedness.

They will help you in preparing a family communication plan and developing a ready kit, so that you can take care of yourself and your family during the days immediately following a major disaster. You will also find information on how to respond to a variety of potential emergencies.

In addition to these national preparedness websites, there are California-specific, regional, and local internet sites, which you can use in planning for emergencies and some of those links are included below.

Quick Reference

How Should You Prepare?

Community

community.gifPreparing the community! Natural and man-made disasters can happen suddenly and at anytime, these sites provide you with information about the importance of planning and preparedness. They will help you in preparing a family communication plan and developing a ready kit, so that you can take care of yourself and your family during the days immediately following a major disaster. You will also find information on how to respond to a variety of potential emergencies.

In addition to these national preparedness websites, there are California-specific, regional, and local internet sites, which you can use in planning for emergencies and some of those links are included below.

Additional Resources
FEMA "Are You Ready"
Ready Gov America
Citizen Corps  
National Oceanic and Atmosphere Administration (NOAA) "Disaster Prevention"
FEMA "Plan Ahead"  
American Red Cross "Prepare and Getting Trained"
American Red Cross "Prepare.Org"
National Oceanic and Atmosphere Administration "Prepare Family"
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) "Emergency Preparedness"  
Pacific Disaster Center "Preparing for Disaster" 

Thank you for taking the time to learn more about preparedness to protect yourself, your family and your community. By preparing today, remember you are also helping our first responders to save lives and property in the event of an emergency.

Schools

Parents and Teachers -California Education Code (Section 32280-32289) requires all public schools (K-12), operated by school districts, to have a comprehensive school safety plan that addresses the safety concerns identified through a systematic planning process. Emergency preparedness is an important responsibility shared by all individuals as well as communities, including schools. Read more here

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Businesses

business.gifBusiness Information-If you aren’t sure whether your property or business is at risk from disasters caused by natural hazards, check with your local building official, city engineer, or planning and zoning administrator. They can tell you whether you are in an area where floods, earthquakes, wildfires, or severe weather conditions are likely to occur. Also, they usually can tell you how to protect yourself, your house, business and property from the different hazards. There are a number of resources available for protecting your business. More specific information available here...

Quick References

My Hazards-hazard information by zip code

FEMA Protect Your Business
FEMA Rebuild Stronger-Smarter
FEMA Security Risk Management Series (RMS) Publications
Ready Business-Prepare, Plan, Stay Informed
Citizen Corps
United States Small Business Association

Government

government.gifGovernment-The California Emergency Management Agency (Cal EMA) coordinates overall state agency response to major disasters in support of local government. The agency is responsible for assuring the state’s readiness to respond to and recover from natural, manmade, and war-caused emergencies, and for assisting local governments in their emergency preparedness, response and recovery efforts. During emergencies, Cal EMA may activate the State Operations Center (SOC) in Sacramento and the Regional Emergency Operations Centers (REOCs) in impacted areas to receive and process local requests for assistance. Cal EMA assists local governments and other state agencies in developing their own emergency preparedness and response plans, in accordance with the Standardized Emergency Management System, the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the State Emergency Plan, for all incidents including earthquakes, floods, fires, hazardous material incidents, nuclear power plant emergencies, and dam breaks. More detailed info available here

Quick References:

 

Emergency Managers

emergency_manager.gifEmergency Managers-During the preparedness phase of emergency management, managers will develop action plans when an emergency strikes. These plans will need to be flexible and all encompassing that recognize all potential risks and exposures for the community, business, government agency, school, or hospital. Planning activities will vary by jurisdiction but should include the following:

• Communication
• Early Warning
• Shelters
• Evacuation Plans
• Resources and Inventory
• Emergency Workers
• Volunteers
• Training
• Access and Functional Needs population
• Non Government Organizations
• Multi-Agency Coordination

Additional more detailed information is available here...​

​Emergency preparedness means being prepared for all kinds of emergencies, able to respond in time of crisis to save lives and property, to help a community or even the nation return to normal life after a disaster, and ensuring that the environment is protected. The potential for a catastrophic event impacting California, the most populous state in the nation with an estimated population of 38 million in 2008, is something that requires this all hazards approach.

How You Should Prepare
California’s federal emergency preparedness partner, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) does an excellent job in its description of preparedness displayed below:

“Preparedness is everyone's job. Not just government agencies but all sectors of society -- service providers, businesses, civic and volunteer groups, industry associations and neighborhood associations, as well as every individual citizen -- should plan ahead for disaster. During the first few hours or days following a disaster, essential services may not be available. People must be ready to act on their own.”

Threats & Hazards
The information available within the “Threats and Hazards” portion of the Planning and Preparedness Division web site is intended to provide preliminary information on potential hazards that may impact the citizenry. The information provided will include preparedness tips and or guidance on how to be ready for these hazards and vulnerabilities should they impact the State.

Determine Your Risk

What are the hazards where you live or work? Find out what natural or human caused disasters pose a risk for you. Do you live near a flood plain, an earthquake fault, or in a high fire danger area? Are you prepared for an unexpected human-made disaster that can strike any time? Does your neighborhood or community have a disaster plan?

SEMS (Standardized Emergency Management System)

The Standardized Emergency Management System (SEMS) is the cornerstone of California’s emergency response system and the fundamental structure for the response phase of emergency management. SEMS is required by the California Emergency Services Act (ESA) for managing multiagency and multijurisdictional responses to emergencies in California. The system unifies all elements of California’s emergency management community into a single integrated system and standardizes key elements.

NIMS (National Incident Management System)

The National Incident Management System (NIMS) provides a systematic, proactive approach to guide departments and agencies at all levels of government, nongovernmental organizations, and the private sector to work seamlessly to prevent, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate the effects of incidents, regardless of cause, size, location, or complexity, in order to reduce the loss of life and property and harm to the environment.

Volunteer and Donate During Disaster
The ability to have volunteers donating time or the public willing to donate money or goods are a very important part within all four phases of emergency management. The ability to draw from and rely on volunteers and donations will ease the workload on first responders and provide critical support during long emergency activations. If you are willing, there is information available within this site to assist you in getting started.

Documents, Publications & Plans
Effective emergency management consists of consise planning, guidance, adherance to regulations, and providing information to all stakeholders.  The ability to easily navigate to the most readily used information is maintained within the documents, publications, and plans portion of this site.

Contacts
If you are unable to locate the information you are looking for or have additional questions, please refer to the contacts portion of the site to garner the information.